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She keeps it simple and I am thankful for her kind of lovin’, ‘cause it’s simple
The Avett Brothers (January Wedding)
yeezuss:

//yeezuss//

yeezuss:

//yeezuss//

kateoplis:

"Mr. McKeever, a lawyer and part-time youth minister at Seventh and James Baptist Church in Waco, had prepared for worse when he committed to wearing the jumpsuit for Lent. After years of providing both spiritual and legal assistance to the poor and formerly incarcerated, it was time to do something more visible to call attention to the nation’s prison crisis, and to the obstacles inmates face on returning to society. But 40 days is a long time to dress like a convict, especially in Texas. “A couple different people said, ‘I hope you don’t get shot!’ ” …
Mr. McKeever, who grew up three hours west in Abilene, has worn prisoner’s clothes while delivering sermons, shopping for groceries, strolling the San Antonio River Walk and taking his daughter to the movies. He has kept a blog reflecting on his experiences (Day 6: “Stares, questioning glances, avoidance”) and on the politics of mass incarceration.
Engaging with those politics is the essence of his Christianity. ‘We follow a condemned criminal!…That’s very much at the heart of our faith. So I try to bring that in.’ …
Among other efforts, he has pushed employers to stop asking about a job applicant’s criminal history — an effort known elsewhere as ‘Ban the Box.’ But as a native Texan, he’s sensitive to tone. ‘I call it a fair-chance hiring policy…It’d be hard even in a conservative place not to get behind something called a fair chance.'”
An Orange jumpsuit for Lent

kateoplis:

"Mr. McKeever, a lawyer and part-time youth minister at Seventh and James Baptist Church in Waco, had prepared for worse when he committed to wearing the jumpsuit for Lent. After years of providing both spiritual and legal assistance to the poor and formerly incarcerated, it was time to do something more visible to call attention to the nation’s prison crisis, and to the obstacles inmates face on returning to society. But 40 days is a long time to dress like a convict, especially in Texas. “A couple different people said, ‘I hope you don’t get shot!’ ” …

Mr. McKeever, who grew up three hours west in Abilene, has worn prisoner’s clothes while delivering sermons, shopping for groceries, strolling the San Antonio River Walk and taking his daughter to the movies. He has kept a blog reflecting on his experiences (Day 6: “Stares, questioning glances, avoidance”) and on the politics of mass incarceration.

Engaging with those politics is the essence of his Christianity. ‘We follow a condemned criminal!…That’s very much at the heart of our faith. So I try to bring that in.’ …

Among other efforts, he has pushed employers to stop asking about a job applicant’s criminal history — an effort known elsewhere as ‘Ban the Box.’ But as a native Texan, he’s sensitive to tone. ‘I call it a fair-chance hiring policy…It’d be hard even in a conservative place not to get behind something called a fair chance.'”

An Orange jumpsuit for Lent

au-fil-de-mes-envies:

Chado Ralph Rucci at New York Fashion Week Spring 2014

au-fil-de-mes-envies:

Chado Ralph Rucci at New York Fashion Week Spring 2014

'She just seems different, you know? I don't know, I just got a feeling about her. You know when a song comes on and you just gotta dance?'

lets-go-lesbos:

Pubes aren’t gross. Armpit hair isn’t gross. Leg hair isn’t gross. Fat isn’t gross. Bones that stick out aren’t gross.

Body policing is gross.

facesofsanctuary:

Bob is happy to be free!
Animal Place, Grass Valley, CA.
© Andrea White 2014

facesofsanctuary:

Bob is happy to be free!

Animal Place, Grass Valley, CA.

© Andrea White 2014